Resignation letter bullying boss (Samples)

Resignation letter bullying boss

In this brief blog post, we will provide examples of a resignation letter bullying boss.

Resignation letter bullying boss

Writing a resignation letter due to a bullying boss can make you feel afraid or scared and even unpleasant since being involved in such a situation with your boss in your workplace is not ideal.

However, trying to solve the situation would be the best thing to do, if after talking things out the situation and relationship with your boss does not improve then you can consider leaving.

Still, giving official notice of your resignation is the way to go, since it speaks about your professionalism.

Even though you may feel upset about the current situation your resignation letter should stay formal and professional. 

Although you can explain the reason why you are resigning, it should be kept brief. Here are some examples of how you could start writing your resignation letter due to a bullying boss.

Sample 1 resignation letter bullying boss

“This resignation letter example is written from the perspective of someone who has had a positive experience, wants to maintain a positive relationship and is thankful for the opportunity:

[Date]

[Immediate Supervisor],

x
[ How to Resign Peacefully ] video

Please accept this letter as notice of my formal resignation from my position at [xyz company]. My last day of employment will be [date].

I want to thank you for providing me with this opportunity three years ago. You saw my potential and provided the chance to learn from you and the team in ways that I could not envision and in ways that were unclear to me at the time. We’ve tackled many successful projects together, but my favorite was [project x]. That’s the project that showcased to me how much your mentorship expanded my [descriptive] expertise, and we had a lot of fun along the way. The time you spent teaching and challenging me has left a lasting impact on my career and development, and I’m grateful to have worked for you.

I wish you and everyone at [company] the best and look forward to staying in touch and helping in any way that I can — during and after this smooth transition. I’m reachable at [email] or [phone].

Sincerely,

[Name]”

Resignation letter bullying boss (Samples)

Sample 2 resignation letter bullying boss

“This job resignation letter example is written from the perspective of someone who has not had a great experience but is choosing to keep any feedback private:

[Name]

[Address, including zip code]

[Phone number or email]

[Date]

[Immediate Supervisor],

I am resigning from my position as [title] for [xyz company] on [date].

I am happy to work with you and the team throughout the next two-week transition. To help ensure a seamless handoff of responsibilities, I’ve listed the projects that I still expect to be outstanding on my last day, including:

[Project One]

[Project Two]

[Project Three]

Thank you very much for the professional and personal development opportunities that you have provided me during the last few years.

Sincerely,

[Name]”

Sample 3 resignation letter bullying boss

“This resignation letter example is written from the perspective of someone who has had a negative experience and wants to speak up. This option challenges the conventional wisdom of many career experts. However, nothing changes without some workplace courage. If you are okay with the potential for negative consequences, go ahead and stand for what you believe.

(Note: the basic resignation letter below focuses on a specific scenario that may not be relevant to you. When modifying this for use, you should update all the language in the template while keeping the tone and style similar to what’s below.)

[Name]

[Address, including zip code]

[Phone number or email]

[Date]

[Immediate Supervisor],

I am resigning from my position at [xyz company], effective [date].

One year ago, you took a chance on me, and I took a chance on the company. I appreciate that both sides took a risk on each other. While it’s tempting just to walk away, I feel obligated to explain my decision in hopes that it sparks positive change for the colleagues that I’m leaving behind.

I’m resigning because the company is using improper accounting to bolster its financial performance. In my initial memo to you dated [month, day, year], I outlined each accounting trick that is hiding losses the company is sustaining. In a subsequent meeting on [month, day, year] and attended by you, [name], and [name], we discussed each of the accounting issues in detail and decided to refer the matter to the company’s Vice President. On [month, day, year] a follow-up meeting was held and attended by the same group, the Vice President said the matter had been investigated and concluded that no changes would be made because we are an “aggressive company.” This is an outcome that I cannot accept.

The company’s business is built on trust. When its customers and employees find out about the true financial performance of the company, their trust will be destroyed and I expect the company will have to cease operations. This letter of resignation is my last effort to implore the company to correct its practices.

Thank you for the opportunity to be heard.

Sincerely,

[Name]”

Resignation letter bullying boss (Samples)

Sample 4 resignation letter bullying boss

“Dear Dr. N. Abler:

I have accepted a position at another institution. This letter serves as my two-week notice.

When some employees resign, they say something trite like, “it is with mixed emotions,” or, “my leaving is bittersweet,” because they want to express their gratitude for the opportunity they’ve been given. I can’t say I’m all that grateful because of the stressful conditions I’ve experienced in the past two years and the lack of support I’ve received.

You talk a good talk about caring for employees and creating a positive work environment, yet your actions — or rather, inaction — make me question your sincerity. You are either ignorant or don’t care about what goes on when employees routinely feel mistreated and bullied by their managers and co-workers — and are ignored by HR.

In my case, I am talking about Sam, my supervisor, who has convinced you that all is well in the department, even though employees are constantly leaving and morale is dismally low. Then, employees are discounted when we attempt to express concerns. It just goes to show how successful Sam has been at manipulating you and HR into believing what a great person Sam is when, in fact, Sam is a first-rate jerk.

I give Sam credit for being personable and friendly at times. This is evident in Sam’s relationship with you and other leaders. I’ve read that bullies are very good at playing politics and promoting themselves among senior leaders, often hoodwinking them into believing they are superior performers. Sam works hard at keeping you from seeing the bully that we see.

Sam exhibits the classic signs of a bully. Sam is manipulative, abusive, and condescending. He berates employees, insinuates that we are incompetent, and makes implicit threats if we don’t perform in the precise way he dictates. Sam also works hard at controlling our actions, keeping us from discussing projects of mutual concern with others, including leaders like you, and berates us when we attempt to do so. Sam doesn’t want you to know of our good efforts nor of behaviors that reflect poorly on Sam’s leadership.

My experience became especially painful after I made the mistake of going to HR. When I presented my concerns, I acted in a fair and professional manner, acknowledging Sam’s good qualities while noting clear behavioral issues that I should not have to tolerate. I was not out to have Sam fired, yet I paid a price. Soon after learning of my concerns, Sam retaliated, denying me opportunities that would support my professional development and chances for advancement. Clearly, HR isn’t going to do anything to protect me or challenge you, especially since you regard Sam so highly.

For a while, I blamed myself for this situation, wondering if Sam was right about my incompetence and that my inferior performance ratings were justified. I have felt physically sick and emotionally drained. But as I examined bullying a little further and what I know to be true about myself — that I have inherent worth and am a talented professional — I realized that Sam’s treatment was precisely because of my competence and because employees like me are easily targeted who are generally sociable, kind, and collaborative. I’m a threat to Sam’s fragile ego.

It’s your loss. I am excited about working with an organization that has a good reputation for caring for its employees and not tolerating bullying by anyone. Their leaders don’t waffle as you do when managers behave badly. As much as I blame Sam, I blame you more. Your blind support for Sam and refusal to see the problem doesn’t benefit anyone, including Sam who could become a better person with a little help. Employees deserve better. Wake up, stop enabling bullies, and get a backbone!”

Other sample resignation letters

Below are some of the other resignation letters we curated.

If you are looking for a job, you should also ideally start your job research on job websites such as Indeed.

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Sample resignation letter going to abroad
Sample resignation letter good terms
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Sample resignation letter government employee Philippines
Sample resignation letter greener pasture
Sample resignation letter health care assistant

If you are suffering from depression, anxiety, loneliness or any similar mental health issue then seeking help for it may be a good option.

Mental health issues such as depression, loneliness and anxiety can affect anyone of us.

If you are under 18 then CAMHS, an NHS run program may just be the answer for your mental health struggles.

You should look to see if you meet the CAMHS referral criteria and then fill in the CAMHS referral form.

Resignation letter bullying boss (Samples)

Daniela Paez

Daniela Paez is a Clinical Psychologist with an MSc. In Clinical Neuropsychology from Bangor University. She has vast experience in working with children with disabilities, adolescents and their families, in extreme conditions of poverty and vulnerability. Additionally, she owns a private practice where she provides neuropsychological evaluation for children and adults, and treatment for mood disorders, anxiety, couple therapy, among other conditions.