What is Phallophobia? (A Summary)

Phallophobia

In this blog we intend to explain the causes, symptoms and treatment for Phallophobia.

What is Phallophobia? (A Summary)

Phallophobia is an irrational fear of an erect penis. It actually refers to a fear of masculinity.

It is an intense fear that marks the person’s life with a lot of anxiety related to a part of the body that is very important for performing various vital functions.

This is an intense fear and the person suffering may avoid what he fears.

These people suffer from extreme anxiety even when they imagine an erect penis. At the sight of one they suffer from a full-blown panic attack.

Women who suffer from Phallophobia are unable to sleep with a man whom they are even romantically involved with as well.

This in turn spoils their relationships and they might not be able to form any long lasting partnerships.

This is not a rare phobia but still varies in severity. It can suddenly be developed or can take some time for symptoms to be severe.

Like most of the phobias, it is an irrational fear, but still it poses a threat to the sufferer’s psyche.

The daily activities of the sufferer are limited and in some cases the anxiety may also lead to depression.

Symptoms of Phallophobia

To avoid the experience of anxiety itself the individual may develop Phallophobia, so as to avoid the very cause of the uncomfortable condition. 

  • Anxiety at the thought of an erect penis
  • Anxiety when seeing an erect penis
  • Unable to be involved in sex especially with a man who has an erect penis

Physical Symptoms

These are intense and can begin without any prior warning.

The person suffering from Phallophobia experiences the full physical intensity of either all of these or some of these in combination with others.

  • hot flashes or chills
  • headaches
  • sweating
  • trembling
  • shortness of breath a choking sensation
  • rapid heartbeat (tachycardia)
  • nausea
  • dizziness
  • feeling faint
  • numbness 
  • dry mouth
  • ringing in ears
  • confusion 
  • hyperventilation
  • raised blood pressure
  • Promiscuous behavior

The Psychological Symptoms

During panic attack the person suffering from Anuptaphobia may experience the following

  • fear of fainting
  • feelings of dread
  • fear of dying
  • huilt
  • shame
  • fear of losing control
  • fear of harm
  • self-blame
  • withdrawn
  • feeling of hopelessness
  • feeling of disconnect
  • confusion
  • lack of concentration
  • anger
  • irritability
  • mood swings
  • afraid of rejection
  • Incapacitated to enjoy the company of their partner
  • False happiness facade

Causes of Phallophobia

As with most phobias and anxieties, there is no clear consensus about what causes Phallophobia, but still a very plausible cause could be a fear of being left alone and not having someone to share their life with.

The most common explanation is a childhood traumatic episode where a child may have experienced a broken marriage of his parents, where one of  them might have been left alone to fend for themselves and the child.

This very well maybe the cause of the person not wanting to end up alone like the parent from the broken relationship.

The person who suffers from Phallophobia might have undergone sexual assault or rape at one point in his or her life.

Thus, developing a fear after associating an erect penis with the pain they received (physical or psychological).

Person suffering from Phallophobia may suffer from low esteem and abandonment issues in childhood.

Therefore, to compensate for these the fear thus develops.

The erect penis also repe=resents masculinity and with a dominant father the person suffering from Phallophobia starts detesting this symbol of masculinity. 

People may also be afraid of losing control because this is something that is not in their hands and not controlled by them, no matter how powerful a person is.

Thus, at the time he is suffering from the symptoms of Phallophobia, he/she feels totally helpless, aggravating their already hiked anxiety.

There are plenty of people with Phallophobia who cannot even recall the traumatic incident that would have developed this fear.

Scientists believe that a combination of genetic tendencies, brain chemistry, and other biological and environmental factors could cause such fears to develop. 

As is common in specific phobias, the cause Phallophobia may lie deep in the person’s childhood or its onset may be due to an environmental factor.

Genetics also plays a pivotal role in the cause of developing Phallophobia

Other causes can be as follow:

• Learned behavior

• Traumatic experiences

What is Phallophobia? (A Summary)

Etiological Models of Phallophobia

1. Biological (Genetic) Model

Genetics also determines how a person reacts and feels. Therefore, people inherit fears and phobias as well from their families.

The brain cells (neurons) release certain chemicals called neurotransmitters.

Serotonin and Dopamine are two neurotransmitters that in depleted states can cause anxiety like symptoms.

2. Psychodiagnostics Model

If a person has suffered from a traumatic experience in early childhood it can have a severe dire impact on his later life. 

A childhood traumatic experience could be where children experienced a negative impact of events due to a change in their life.

This may leave a long lasting impression.

Reading books that have a detailed account of broken relationships and single miserable people, also anecdotes of unwarranted changes that altered the lives of these people, can add to the fears.

3. Behavioral Model

According to this model, irrational fears  may be caused through behaviors that are learned by replication.

Children often replicate unique behaviors of their adults, parents or a favorite aunt or uncle.

If a family member is already suffering from anxiety or is scared of one or another thing, then chances are higher that only by observing this, the child may develop fears.

It is also commonly seen that various religions and societies of the world consider marriage and consummation a sacred rite that should be carried out.

If not, then the person is reverted to sinning. Living alone is also considered immoral to them.

Treatments of Phallophobia

Phallophobia can be treated through different treatments.

These include Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT), Exposure Therapy, Neuro Linguistic Program (NLP), Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction MBSR) and forms of meditation.

1) Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT)

In CBT the therapist helps the client to amend his thoughts so that a desirable behavior can be achieved.

This therapy is effective, because if the thoughts or cognitions alter then there will be a lasting impact on behavior.

The therapist helps the client to discover the reason for this thought, his behavior in regards to changes in life.

This therapy is goal oriented and short termed. Therefore, the results are seen soon. It changes the way a person thinks and feels.

CBT does not focus on probing the past to resolve current problems, rather it concentrates on the present situation. 

Our thoughts determine how we act or react to certain stimuli and situations.

Therefore, negative thoughts bring about a negative behavior response or an undesirable behavior.

Whereas, positive thoughts propagate desirable and healthy attitude and response.

For the treatment of Phallophobia, the therapist separates the problem into parts.

These may include: thoughts, feelings and actions. 

  1. What thought is invoked at the thought of an erect penis?
  2. How do you feel when you see an erect penis?
  3. What do you do when you think of an erect penis? 

Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT) is a form of CBT and designed by Albert Ellis. According to Ellis, “people are not disturbed by things but rather by their view of things.”

This is what subjective perspective is. 

In Phallophobia, the person thinks of staying away from sex and gets anxious because there is a fear of being alone for the rest of their lives.

2 Exposure Therapy 

It is one of the most frequently used ways of treating patients with Phallophobia.

In this therapy, the patient is exposed to the source of his fear over a certain span of time.

To begin with the therapy, the therapist exposes the patient to the least triggering stimuli.

As the therapy progresses and the patient is able to control his anxious feelings, imagery can be used to take the treatment a step further.

In this part of the treatment the patient is asked to visualize/imagine a situation that makes him anxious.

During this process of imagery, one actually feels being in that particular situation or place, experiencing various senses.

 Once the person successfully, without feeling anxious clears this step of the therapy, he is then exposed to real life situations.

While the patient is being exposed to different intensities of stimuli during the various stages of therapy, the therapist simultaneously teaches them coping exercises.

These include, breathing techniques or muscle relaxation methods to lower their anxiety, when in an actual fear/anxiety causing situation.

This teaches them how to remain calm when exposed to the fear stimuli.

Before actually starting the exposure therapy, the therapist needs to figure out the intensity of the patient’s fear, as to deduce whether they will be able to undergo this treatment, without any physical or psychological harm caused to them during the exposure processes. 

3) Neuro Linguistic Program (NLP)

In this therapy the client is asked to 

  1. Access the phobia in a safe environment.
  2. Help them to replay the phobia along with happy emotions.
  3. Disassociate from the phobia.

4) Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR)

MBSR involves being aware of one’s own thoughts, feelings and reducing the interference from around the environment.

We do not pay attention to how we process the various stimuli that affect us. 

We do not process the way our bodies feel and respond, there is no focus on our thoughts and how these thoughts are influencing our emotions. 

In MBSR, the client is ‘woken up’ to actually experience the various senses. ‘Focus’ is the keyword!

In Phallophobia treatment, the client is made conscious to pay attention to his thoughts when he is thinking of what he is afraid of.

Awareness helps to alleviate the stress symptoms. 

5) Meditation

For meditation to be effective during treatment, the mind is cleared off all the clutter of random thoughts.

The mind and body are made to be ‘in sync’ with each other, so that the feared stimulus does not invoke a negative thought.

The client will meditate during the thoughts of death and concentrate on his breathing patterns in the presence of the feared stimulus. 

6) Self-Help Groups

Self Help groups are an effective type of therapy, in which the client does not find himself as a lone sufferer.

These groups are individuals who are afflicted with the same types of phobias.

They come together to share their thoughts, experiences and their coping strategies. This also helps in developing a ‘sense of I am not the only one’ suffering.

7) Changing Lifestyle

Breaking down the dullness of the daily, helps break down anxiety as well. 

• Take up jogging or go for daily walks:

Developing a walk routine can damper the way our negative thoughts control our behavior.

• Indulging in an exercise regime:

Vigorous exercise like aerobics has proved to reduce or alleviate the symptoms of stress and anxiety.

Exercise helps the mind to cope with stress and stressful situations better.

This is what the American Psychological Association has to say about inducting exercise to eliminate stress or phobias.

• Altering eating and drinking habits:

Cutting down on fatty foods and caffeine can improve self-image, that in turn leads to a raised self-esteem.

This finally diminishes the symptoms of stress to a bare minimum. With high intake of caffeine, the body resembles a ‘fight or flight’ response, thus giving way to anxiety.

• Improving the sleep cycle:

When we get proper rest, our concentration improves. 

8) Psychiatric Medication 

There are a number of medicines that the Psychiatrist can prescribe if the symptoms of Phallophobia are severe.

Anxiolytics (anti-anxiety drugs)

These should only be taken after the consultation with the doctor and shouldn’t be initiated or discontinued as per personal discretion.

Antidepressants 

These medicines are not only used to treat depression, but also to alleviate the symptoms of Phallophobia as well as other phobias.

Medicines alone might not be as effective, but if used in conjunction with therapies then the results will be better. 

9)  Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT)

This kind of therapy is used to regulate the emotions.

A technique called “half-smiling” is used where the client is asked to lift the corners of his mouth when the feared thought comes to his mind.

Apart from this the mind is to be trained to refrain from thinking about the painful stimulus.

Coping Ahead is another technique in DBT that requires the client to sit quietly and think of the feared situation and strategize what he will do.

We are always here to answer if you have any queries.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. Penis is an object of desire. How can it be feared?

Penis can be feared if it is taken as an object representing masculinity.

If there is a male dominant figure in the family, then the person might be afraid of what it is represented with.

  1. How common is Phallophobia?

Phallophobia is one of the rare phobias present.

  1. How do I overcome my fear of the male?

You can overcome your fear of males by getting therapies like Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Mindfulness, to name a few.

Phobias A-Z

Below is a complete list of all Phobias which we currently cover.

Phobias beginning with A
ABLUTOPHOBIA
Acarophobia
Achluophobia
ACOUSTICOPHOBIA
Acrophobia
Aeroacrophobia
Aerophobia
Agoraphobia
Agoraphobia
Agoraphobia
Agoraphobia
AGORAPHOBIA
Agraphobia
Agrizoophobia
AICHMOPHOBIA
ALEKTOROPHOBIA
ALGOPHOBIA
Alliumphobia
Allodoxaphobia
Amathophobia
Amaxophobia
Ambulophobia
Amychophobia
Anablephobia
Anatidaephobia
Ancraophobia
Androphobia
Anginophobia
Angrophobia
Anthophobia
Anthropophobia
Antlophobia
Anuptaphobia
Apeirophobia
Aphenphosmphobia
Apotemnophobia
Arachibutyrophobia
Arachnophobia
Arsonphobia
Asthenophobia
Astrophobia
Ataxophobia
Atelophobia
Atephobia
Athazagoraphobia
Athazagoraphobia
Atheophobia
Aulophobia
Aurophobia
Automysophobia
Autophobia
Phobias beginning with B
Ballistophobia
Barophobia
Basophobia
Bathmophobia
Bathophobia
Bibliophobia
Blennophobia
Bogyphobia
Botanophobia
Brontophobia
Bufonophobia
Phobias beginning with C
Cacophobia
Cancerophobia
Cardiophobia
Carnophobia
Catagelophobia
Chaetophobia
Chemophobia
Cherophobia
CHIONOPHOBIA
Chiraptophobia
Chirophobia
Chiroptophobia
Chorophobia
Chrometophobia
Chromophobia
Chronomentrophobia
Chronophobia
Claustrophobia
Cleithrophobia
Cnidophobia
Coimetrophobia
Consecotaleophobia
Coprophobia
Coronaphobia
Coulrophobia
Cryophobia
Cyanophobia
Cyclophobia
Cymophobia
Cynophobia
Phobias beginning with D
Decidophobia
Deipnophbia
Dementophobia
Demonophobia
Dendrophobia
Dentophobia
Dermatophobia
Dextrophobia
Dinophobia
Dipsophobia
Dishabiliophobia
Disposophobia
Doraphobia
Dromophobia
Dystychiphobia
Phobias beginning with E
Ecclesiophobia
Ecophobia
Eisoptrophobia
Electrophobia
Eleutherophobia
Emetophobia
Enetophobia
Enissophobia
Enochlophobia
Eosophobia
Ephebiphobia
Epistemophobia
Equinophobia
Eremophobia
Ergophobia
Erotophobia
Erythrophobia
Euphobia
Phobias beginning with F
Fear
Fear of Bald People
fear of eating in public
Fear of Jumping
Fear of life
Fear of Mirror
Fear of Mushrooms
Francophobia
Fruit phobia
Phobias beginning with G
Gamophobia
Gatophobia
Geliophobia
Geniophobia
Genuphobia
Gephyrophobia
Germanophobia
Gerontophobia
Glossophobia
Graphophobia
Phobias beginning with H
Hadephobia
Hagiophobia
Harpaxophobia
Heliophobia
Hellenologophobia
Hemophobia
Herpetophobia
Hexakosioihexekontahexaphobia
Hobophobia
Hodophobia
Homichlophobia
Hoplophobia
Hormephobia
Hydrophobophobia
Hygrophobia
Hylophobia
Hypegiaphobia
Hypengyophobia
Phobias beginning with I
Iatrophobia
Ichthyophobia
Ideophobia
Insectophobia
Iophobia
Phobias beginning with J
Japanophobia
Phobias beginning with K
Kakorrhaphiophobia
Katsaridaphobia
Kenophobia
Kleptophobia
Koinoniphobia
Kolpophobia
Kopophobia
Kosmikophobia
Phobias beginning with L
Lachanophobia
Leukophobia
Levophobia
Lilapsophobia
Limnophobia
Linonophobia
Liticaphobia
Logizomechanophobia
Logophobia
Lutraphobia
Phobias beginning with M
Macrophobia
Mageirocophobia
Mastigophobia
Mechanophobia
Megalophobia
Melissophobia
Melophobia
Merinthophobia
Metallophobia
Metathesiophobia
Metrophobia
Microphobia
Mnemophobia
Mottephobia
Mycophobia
Myrmecophobia
Mysophobia
Mythophobia
Phobias beginning with N
Negrophobia
Nelophobia
Nelophobia
Nephophbia
Noctiphobia
Nosocomephobia
Nosophobia
Nostophobia
Novercaphobia
Nucleomituphobia
Nudophobia
Numerophobia
Nyctohylophobia
Phobias beginning with O
Obesophobia
Ochophobia
Octophobia
Odontophobia
Oenophobia
Olfactophobia
Ommetaphobia
Omphalophobia
Oneirogmophobia
Oneirophobia
Onomatophobia
Ophidiophobia
Ornithophobia
Orthophobia
Ostraconophobia
Phobias beginning with P
Panophobia
Papaphobia
Papyrophobia
Parasitophobia
Paraskevidekatriaphobia
Parenthophobia
Pediculophobia
Pediophobia
Pedophobia
Peniaphobia
Phallophobia
Pharmacophobia
Phasmophobia
Phengophobia
Philophobia
Philosophobia
Phobic Disorder
Phronemophobia
Plutophobia
Pluviophobia
Pnigophobia
Pocrescophobia
Pogonophobia
Polyphobia
Ponophobia
Pornphobia
Porphyrophobia
Psychophobia
Pteronophobia
Pupaphobia
Pyrophobia
Phobias beginning with Q
Quadrophobia
Phobias beginning with R
Rectophobia
Rhytiphobia
Rupophobia
Phobias beginning with S
Samhainophobia
Sanguivoriphobia
Scatophobia
Scelerophobia
Scholiononophobia
Sciophobia
Scoleciphobia
Scopophobia
Scotomaphobia
Scriptophobia
Selachophobia
Selaphobia
Selenophobia
Sesquipedalophobia
Siderodromophobia
Sitophobia
Soceraphobia
Sociophobia
Somniphobia
Soteriophobia
Spacephobia
Spectrophobia
Spheksophobia
Submechanophobia
Suriphobia
Syngenesophobia
Phobias beginning with T
Tachophobia
Taphephobia
Taurophobia
Telephonophobia
Testophobia
Thaasophobia
Thalassophobia
Thantophobia
Thermophobia
Tomophobia
Topophobia
Traumatophobia
Triskaidekaphobia
Tropophobia
Trypanophobia
Trypophobia
Tyrannophobia
Phobias beginning with U
Urophobia
Phobias beginning with V
Venustraphobia
Vestiphobia
Virginitiphobia
Vitricophobia
Phobias beginning with W
Wiccaphobia
Phobias beginning with X
Xanthophobia
Xenoglossophobia
Xerophobia
Xylophobia
Xyrophobia
Phobias beginning with Z
Zelophobia
Zemmiphobia
Zeusophobia
Zoophobia

Titles to Read 

  • The Anxiety and Phobia Workbook by Edmund J. Bourne PhD | May 1, 2020
  • Anxiety, Phobias, and Panic by Reneau Peurifoy | Feb 1, 2005
  • Dying of Embarrassment: Help for Social Anxiety and Phobia by Barbara G. Markway, C. Alec Pollard, et al. | Oct 1, 1992
  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Made Simple: 10 Strategies for Managing Anxiety, Depression, Anger, Panic, and Worry by Seth J. Gillihan Ph.D  | May 22, 2018
  • The CBT Deck: 101 Practices to Improve Thoughts, Be in the Moment & Take Action in Your Life by Seth Gillihan | Jun 11, 2019

Citations 

  • www.psychtimes.com
  • www.fearof.net
  • www.amazon.com
  • www.exploringyourmind.com
  • www.albertellis.com

What is Phallophobia? (A Summary)

Juanita Agboola

Juanita Agboola is the editor in chief of HFNE and an expert in mental health online. She has been writing about online behavior, mental health and psychology issues since 2012. All Guides are reviewed by our editorial team which constitutes various clinical psychologists, PhD and PsyD colleagues.