List of phobias A to Z (339+)

Phobia

List of phobias A-z

Below are a list of phobias which we cover.

Phobias beginning with A

ABLUTOPHOBIA
Acarophobia
Achluophobia
ACOUSTICOPHOBIA
Acrophobia
Aeroacrophobia
Aerophobia
Agoraphobia
Agoraphobia
Agoraphobia
Agoraphobia
AGORAPHOBIA
Agraphobia
Agrizoophobia
AICHMOPHOBIA
ALEKTOROPHOBIA
ALGOPHOBIA
Alliumphobia
Allodoxaphobia
Amathophobia
Amaxophobia
Ambulophobia
Amychophobia
Anablephobia
Anatidaephobia
Ancraophobia
Androphobia
Anginophobia
Angrophobia
Anthophobia
Anthropophobia
Antlophobia
Anuptaphobia
Apeirophobia
Aphenphosmphobia
Apotemnophobia
Arachibutyrophobia
Arachnophobia
Arsonphobia
Asthenophobia
Astrophobia
Ataxophobia
Atelophobia
Atephobia
Athazagoraphobia
Athazagoraphobia
Atheophobia
Aulophobia
Aurophobia
Automysophobia
Autophobia

Phobias beginning with B

Ballistophobia
Barophobia
Basophobia
Bathmophobia
Bathophobia
Bibliophobia
Blennophobia
Bogyphobia
Botanophobia
Brontophobia
Bufonophobia

Phobias beginning with C

Cacophobia
Cancerophobia
Cardiophobia
Carnophobia
Catagelophobia
Chaetophobia
Chemophobia
Cherophobia
CHIONOPHOBIA
Chiraptophobia
Chirophobia
Chiroptophobia
Chorophobia
Chrometophobia
Chromophobia
Chronomentrophobia
Chronophobia
Claustrophobia
Cleithrophobia
Cnidophobia
Coimetrophobia
Consecotaleophobia
Coprophobia
Coronaphobia
Coulrophobia
Cryophobia
Cyanophobia
Cyclophobia
Cymophobia
Cynophobia

Phobias beginning with D

Decidophobia
Deipnophbia
Dementophobia
Demonophobia
Dendrophobia
Dentophobia
Dermatophobia
Dextrophobia
Dinophobia
Dipsophobia
Dishabiliophobia
Disposophobia
Doraphobia
Dromophobia
Dystychiphobia

Phobias beginning with E

Ecclesiophobia
Ecophobia
Eisoptrophobia
Electrophobia
Eleutherophobia
Emetophobia
Enetophobia
Enissophobia
Enochlophobia
Eosophobia
Ephebiphobia
Epistemophobia
Equinophobia
Eremophobia
Ergophobia
Erotophobia
Erythrophobia
Euphobia

Phobias beginning with F

Fear
Fear of Bald People
fear of eating in public
Fear of Jumping
Fear of life
Fear of Mirror
Fear of Mushrooms
Francophobia
Fruit phobia

Phobias beginning with G

Gamophobia
Gatophobia
Geliophobia
Geniophobia
Genuphobia
Gephyrophobia
Germanophobia
Gerontophobia
Glossophobia
Graphophobia

Phobias beginning with H

Hadephobia
Hagiophobia
Harpaxophobia
Heliophobia
Hellenologophobia
Hemophobia
Herpetophobia
Hexakosioihexekontahexaphobia
Hobophobia
Hodophobia
Homichlophobia
Hoplophobia
Hormephobia
Hydrophobophobia
Hygrophobia
Hylophobia
Hypegiaphobia
Hypengyophobia

Phobias beginning with I

Iatrophobia
Ichthyophobia
Ideophobia
Insectophobia
Iophobia

Phobias beginning with J

Japanophobia

Phobias beginning with K

Kakorrhaphiophobia
Katsaridaphobia
Kenophobia
Kleptophobia
Koinoniphobia
Kolpophobia
Kopophobia
Kosmikophobia

Phobias beginning with L

Lachanophobia
Leukophobia
Levophobia
Lilapsophobia
Limnophobia
Linonophobia
Liticaphobia
Logizomechanophobia
Logophobia
Lutraphobia

Phobias beginning with M

Macrophobia
Mageirocophobia
Mastigophobia
Mechanophobia
Megalophobia
Melissophobia
Melophobia
Merinthophobia
Metallophobia
Metathesiophobia
Metrophobia
Microphobia
Mnemophobia
Mottephobia
Mycophobia
Myrmecophobia
Mysophobia
Mythophobia

Phobias beginning with N

Negrophobia
Nelophobia
Nelophobia
Nephophbia
Noctiphobia
Nosocomephobia
Nosophobia
Nostophobia
Novercaphobia
Nucleomituphobia
Nudophobia
Numerophobia
Nyctohylophobia

Phobias beginning with O

Obesophobia
Ochophobia
Octophobia
Odontophobia
Oenophobia
Olfactophobia
Ommetaphobia
Omphalophobia
Oneirogmophobia
Oneirophobia
Onomatophobia
Ophidiophobia
Ornithophobia
Orthophobia
Ostraconophobia

Phobias beginning with P

Panophobia
Papaphobia
Papyrophobia
Parasitophobia
Paraskevidekatriaphobia
Parenthophobia
Pediculophobia
Pediophobia
Pedophobia
Peniaphobia
Phallophobia
Pharmacophobia
Phasmophobia
Phengophobia
Philophobia
Philosophobia
Phobic Disorder
Phronemophobia
Plutophobia
Pluviophobia
Pnigophobia
Pocrescophobia
Pogonophobia
Polyphobia
Ponophobia
Pornphobia
Porphyrophobia
Psychophobia
Pteronophobia
Pupaphobia
Pyrophobia

Phobias beginning with Q

Quadrophobia

Phobias beginning with R

Rectophobia
Rhytiphobia
Rupophobia

Phobias beginning with S

Samhainophobia
Sanguivoriphobia
Scatophobia
Scelerophobia
Scholiononophobia
Sciophobia
Scoleciphobia
Scopophobia
Scotomaphobia
Scriptophobia
Selachophobia
Selaphobia
Selenophobia
Sesquipedalophobia
Siderodromophobia
Sitophobia
Soceraphobia
Sociophobia
Somniphobia
Soteriophobia
Spacephobia
Spectrophobia
Spheksophobia
Submechanophobia
Suriphobia
Syngenesophobia

Phobias beginning with T

Tachophobia
Taphephobia
Taurophobia
Telephonophobia
Testophobia
Thaasophobia
Thalassophobia
Thantophobia
Thermophobia
Tomophobia
Topophobia
Traumatophobia
Triskaidekaphobia
Tropophobia
Trypanophobia
Trypophobia
Tyrannophobia

Phobias beginning with U

Urophobia

Phobias beginning with V

Venustraphobia
Vestiphobia
Virginitiphobia
Vitricophobia

Phobias beginning with W

Wiccaphobia

Phobias beginning with X

Xanthophobia
Xenoglossophobia
Xerophobia
Xylophobia
Xyrophobia

Phobias beginning with Z


Zelophobia
Zemmiphobia
Zeusophobia
Zoophobia

What is a Phobia?

A phobia is a persistent, unnecessary, fear of an item, person, creature, action or circumstance. Phobias are a type of anxiety. A person with a phobia either attempts to maintain ample distance from the thing that triggers their fear or faces it with very deep levels of anxiety. 

Some phobias are limited in scope. For example, a person may fear spiders (arachnophobia) or cats (ailurophobia). Right now, this person lives generally free from their anxiety caused by a phobia by maintaining substantial distance from the trigger Some phobias cause inconvenience in multiple circumstances. For example, side effects of acrophobia (fear of heights) can be activated by glancing out the window of a high rise building or by driving over a high scaffold. The fear of small spaces (claustrophobia) can be activated by riding in an elevator or by using a small restroom. Individuals with these phobias significantly alter the course of their lives around these fears. In extreme cases, the phobia may have an impact on their work environment, commute, recreational and social activities, or home life.

Types of Phobias

There are three main kinds of phobias: 

Specific phobia (basic phobia). With this most regular type of phobia, people may fear creatures (such as canines, felines, insects, or snakes), people (such as jokers, dentists, other medical professionals), conditions (such as darkness, storms, and falling) or circumstances (such as flying on an airplane, riding on a train, or being in an enclosed space). Of note, these conditions are mostly hereditary (acquired) and appear to run in families. 

Social anxiety disorder (once called “social phobia”). People with social anxiety disorder fear social circumstances where they may be mortified, humiliated or judged by others. They become especially on edge when meeting new people. The fear may be limited to certain situations, such as public speaking and giving any sort of business presentation. Alternatively, social anxiety disorder can arise in a variety of situations that cause the individual to avoid almost any social situation. Social anxiety also runs in families. People who were shy or lonely as kids or who have a past filled with negative social encounters are likely to suffer from social anxiety disorder. 

Agoraphobia. Agoraphobia is a fear of being out in public places where you can’t make a discreet exit. A person with agoraphobia may avoid seeing movies & plays or avoid taking public transportation. Numerous people with agoraphobia additionally have physical manifestations of their fear or frenzy disorder (physical side effects can include trembling, heart palpitations and perspiring). 

Phobias start in childhood between the ages of 5 and 9, and will not last a very long time. Most longer-enduring phobias start at a later age, usually when someone is in their 20s. Adult phobias will, in general, persist for quite some time and many people are reluctant to address them head on. Phobia can increase the risk of different kinds of anxiety disorders, existential dread or substance abuse. 

Causes

Genetic and environmental factors can cause phobias. Young people who have relatives with anxiety disorders are at risk of developing phobias. Traumatic events, such as almost suffocating, can also cause phobias. Introduction to enclosed spaces, heights, and insects could also bring on phobias at any age. 

People who have long-standing illnesses are also likely to have phobias. People who suffer traumatic brain injuries are also likely to develop phobias. Phobias can also stem from substance abuse of either drugs or alcohol. 

Phobias can also stem from psychological instabilities such as schizophrenia. Schizophrenic patients often experience visual and auditory hallucinations, suspicions, anhedonia and other delusions.

List of phobias A to Z (339+)

Symptoms of Phobias

The symptoms of phobia are: 

  • Excessive, unreasonable, & persistent feelings of fear or anxiety that are triggered by a particular object, activity or situation.
  • Feelings stem without regard to any real risk. For example, many people may fear aggressive dogs but most people don’t feel scared by a well trained dog on a leash. 
  • Evasion of the object, action or circumstance that triggers the phobia. Since people who have phobias perceive that their fears are overstated, they are regularly embarrassed or feel humiliated by their symptoms. To forestall anxiety symptoms or humiliation, they stay away from the triggers of the phobia. 
  • Anxiety-related physical symptoms. These can incorporate tremors, palpitations, sweating, shortness of breath, discombobulation, sickness or different symptoms that mirror the body’s “battle or flight” reaction to peril. (Symptoms such as these may prompt a conclusion of frenzy disorder.) 

List of phobias A to Z (339+)

Diagnosis

A mental health professional would likely gather information about current symptoms and family history regarding phobias. In most cases, you would share the event that set off the phobia to get some information about current symptoms and family ancestry, especially whether other relatives have had phobias. You may need to report any understanding or injury that may have set off the phobia – for example, being attacked by a dog causing a fear of dogs. Your doctor will ask about depression and substance use because many people with phobias have these problems as well.

It may be useful to examine how you respond – your thoughts, feelings and physical reactions – when you face your fears. Likewise, it might be helpful to examine what you do to stay away from phobia-inducing circumstances, and how the phobia influences your daily life, including your activities and social engagements. 

Treatment

Phobias are almost always treatable, and people who have them are very mindful of their disorder. This helps move people through the treatment process. Speaking to a psychologist or mental health professional is a valuable first step in treating a phobia. 

On the off chance that the phobia doesn’t cause extreme issues in your life, most people find that just keeping away from the trigger of their fear helps them feel like they’re in control. Numerous people with phobias won’t look for treatment as these fears are often manageable. 

It is nearly impossible to keep away from triggers of some phobias, which is common for many complex phobias. In these situations, speaking to a mental health professional can be the start of the recovery process.

Most phobias can be cured with the appropriate treatment. There is no single treatment that works for each person with a phobia. WIth the right treatment, most people will be well on the road to recovery.

List of phobias A to Z (339+)

FAQs on Phobias:

Do social phobias run in families?

Based on current research, it’s likely that if someone else in your family has a social phobia, then you are at a higher risk of developing one as well. However, this does not mean that you are guaranteed to develop a social phobia. Even if you have a genetic predisposition to social phobia, there’s no guarantee that you will develop one yourself.

Does social phobia disappear on its own?

Social phobia doesn’t disappear on its own. However, there are several things you can do to help lessen the effects that social phobia has on your daily life. A lot of treatment methods require working closely with a professional to understand the origins of your phobia and what stimuli you are most sensitive to when confronted with the phobia. Others are able to do work themselves without professional help in order to master the fear associated with the phobia.

How do I prevent phobias from developing?

More research is needed on this topic-at the moment, there is no clear answer on what you can do to prevent social phobia. However, starting treatment for phobias as soon as you see them develop can be helpful in mitigating the severity of the phobia. As discussed above, treatment can involve anything from CBT to medication. Being aware of your phobias is also a key way to ensure that you treat the symptoms and the cause of the phobia as soon as possible. 

Interested to learn more? Check out these books on phobias:

  • The A-Z of Phobias, Fears, and Anxieties (Facts on File Library of Health & Living)
  • Face Your Fears: A Proven Plan to Beat Anxiety, Panic, Phobias, and Obsessions
  • Treating Affect Phobia: A Manual for Short-Term Dynamic Psychotherapy

References

Hauser, J. (2020). Frequently Asked Questions about Social Phobia. Psych Central. Retrieved on April 22, 2020, from https://psychcentral.com/lib/frequently-asked-questions-about-social-phobia/

List of phobias A to Z (339+)

Aura Des los Santos

Aura Des los Santos is a Clinical Psychologist with two masters degree in Education. One focused in Higher Educacion and the other in the research of Psychology of Education. Her experience is focused on working depression, anxiety and personal development. She frequently writes articles in the area of psychology, education, travel and general culture.