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If I Lose ESA, Will I Also Lose PIP? | HFNE

If I lose ESA, will I also lose PIP?

If I lose ESA will I also lose PIP

In this article, titled “If I lose my ESA, will I also lose PIP?” we highlight the differences between PIP and ESA awards, and we talk about the changes that affect your benefits payment. 

If I lose ESA, will I also lose PIP?

If I lose ESA will I lose PIP?

The ESA awards will have no adverse effect whatsoever on your PIP payments, and vice versa.  PIP is a totally different “Benefit”, and it is not liable to Tax, nor is it classed as income for the purposes of a means test for Income Related (IR)ESA of other IR benefits.

The criteria for both benefits are different. The two are separate and serve different purposes. ESA is an out of work benefit, supporting people under the state pension age who have limited capability to work. PIP is intended to cover some of the additional costs of having a long term health condition and is available to people in or out of work.

PIP and ESA Assessment processes

PIP and ESA have similar assessment processes. All claimants begin by filling in application forms detailing their conditions and their effect on their day-to-day lives. These are submitted, alongside any supporting evidence (for example, from medical professionals or carers) to the Department for Work and Pensions. 

The Department then forwards the forms to one of three contracted assessment providers. The contractors assess the claimant’s functional impairment against a series of descriptors provided by DWP. For some claimants, the assessment is made on the basis of written evidence alone. Most, however, are required to attend a face-to-face assessment carried out by a healthcare professional (HCP) employed by the contractor. 

Following the assessment, the HCP sends a report recommending descriptors to DWP, where a Decision Maker decides on entitlement.

If the claimant disagrees with the decision, they can challenge it by requesting a Mandatory Reconsideration (MR). This is an internal review of the original decision by a second DWP Decision Maker. If claimants are still unsatisfied with the outcome after MR, they can go to a Tribunal.

Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

Personal Independence Payment (PIP) can help you with some of the extra costs if you have a long term ill-health or disability.

You could get between £23.20 and £148.85 a week if you’re aged 16 or over and have not reached State Pension age.

The amount you get depends on how your condition affects you, not the condition itself.

You’ll be assessed by a health professional to work out the level of help you can get. Your rate will be regularly reviewed to make sure you’re getting the right support.

Eligibility for PIP

  1. You can get PIP whether you’re working or not.
  2. You must be aged 16 or over and usually have not reached State Pension age to claim.
  3. You must also have a health condition or disability where you:
  • have had difficulties with daily living or getting around (or both) for 3 months
  • expect these difficulties to continue for at least 9 months
  1. You usually need to have lived in England, Scotland or Wales for at least 2 of the last 3 years, and be in one of these countries when you apply. If you’ve recently returned from living in an EEA country, you might be able to get PIP sooner.

Daily living difficulties

You may get the daily living part of PIP if you need help more than half of the time with things like:

  • preparing or eating food
  • washing, bathing and using the toilet
  • dressing and undressing
  • reading and communicating
  • managing your medicines or treatments
  • making decisions about money
  • engaging with other people

Mobility difficulties

You may get the mobility part of PIP if you need help going out or moving around.

You’ll be assessed by an independent healthcare professional to help DWP work out the level of help you need.

If I lose ESA, will I also lose PIP?

Employment and Support Allowance (ESA)

You can apply for Employment and Support Allowance (ESA) if you have a disability or health condition that affects how much you can work.

ESA gives you:

  • money to help with living costs if you’re unable to work
  • support to get back into work if you’re able to

You can apply for ESA if you’re employed, self-employed or unemployed.

Eligibility for ESA

You can apply for Employment and Support Allowance (ESA) if you’re under State Pension age and you have a disability or health condition that affects how much you can work.

You can apply whether you’re in or out of work. There are conditions to working while claiming ESA.

You cannot get ESA at the same time as:

  • Statutory Sick Pay
  • Statutory Maternity Pay
  • Jobseeker’s Allowance

‘New style’ ESA

Most new claims are for ‘new style’ ESA.

To get ‘new style’ ESA you need to have both:

  • worked as an employee or been self-employed
  • paid enough National Insurance contributions in the last 2 to 3 years – National Insurance credits also count

You cannot get ‘new style’ ESA if you:

  • get the severe disability premium, or are entitled to it
  • got or were entitled to the severe disability premium in the last month, and you’re still eligible for it

You cannot get ‘new style’ ESA if you’re getting Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) from an employer. You can apply for ‘new style’ ESA up to 3 months before your SSP ends. You’ll start getting ‘new style’ ESA as soon as your SSP ends.

You can get income-related or contribution-based ESA if you:

  • get the severe disability premium, or are entitled to it
  • got or were entitled to the severe disability premium in the last month, and you’re still eligible for it

You can apply for contribution-based ESA if you’ve been employed or self-employed and paid National Insurance contributions, usually in the last 2 to 3 years. National Insurance credits can also count.

If you have not paid enough National Insurance contributions in the last 2 to 3 years you may be able to get income-related ESA. You cannot get income-related ESA if you have savings or investments worth over £16,000.

Changes that affect your PIP

You need to tell the DWP as soon as possible if your condition changes because this can affect your Personal Independence Payment (PIP).

Examples of things that may change how your condition affects you include:

  • your condition gets better or worse
  • the level of help you need changes
  • you go into hospital or a care home for more than 28 days (if you’re under 18 on the day you go into hospital your PIP won’t be affected)

Examples of a change of circumstances you must report include:

  • you go abroad for more than 13 weeks
  • you change your name, address or bank account details for payment
  • you go into or leave prison or legal custody

Changes you don’t have to report

You don’t have to report the following changes because they don’t affect whether you can get PIP or how much you get:

  • being in work, returning to work or leaving work
  • changes in your earnings or other income
  • if someone joins or leaves your household

Changes that affect your ESA

If there’s a change in your circumstances, you need to tell the DWP about it because it could affect your ESA.

You need to do this whether you’re in the support group or the work-related activity group.

The DWP need to know about changes to do with your condition, for example, if it:

  • gets better
  • gets worse
  • changes to another condition

They also need to know about any changes to your living arrangements. For example, if you:

  • move house
  • go into or leave hospital, prison or legal custody
  • go abroad or are about to go abroad

If you get income-related ESA you need to tell the DWP if you:

  • start living with someone
  • have someone come to live in your house
  • get married or divorced
  • form or break up a civil partnership

You must also tell the DWP about any changes to the money coming into or going out of your household. This includes things like if you or your partner start or stop getting a benefit, an allowance or a pension income. Or if you or your partner start work.

There are lots of things that could affect your ESA and these are just some examples.

If you’re not sure whether the DWP needs to know something, it’s best to tell them anyway.

Conclusions

In this article, titled “If I lose my ESA, will I also lose PIP?” we highlighted the differences between PIP and ESA awards, and we talked about the changes that affect your benefits payment. 

There are lots of things that could affect your ESA or PIP payments, and we only managed to cover some of them. It is always best to contact de DWP for more information and guidance. 

Please feel free to leave any comments and questions in the comments section below.

FAQ on If I lose ESA will I lose PIP

What happens when ESA stops?

When ESA stops because you failed a medical assessment you will either need to sign on for Job Seekers Allowance or make an appeal. 

Can DWP stop ESA?

The DWP can stop all ESA payments until a claimant can provide information without the DWP notifying the claimant as to what information is needed.

How many ESA appeals are successful?

Overall, 73% of ESA appeals are successful, with the claimant getting a better award than they originally received from the DWP.

Can ESA stop your money?

The DWP can stop your ESA money after one year. You’ll usually have to undergo another Work Capability Assessment to see if you’re still eligible for help because of your illness or disability.

Do I still get ESA while appealing?

You will not get ESA during your appeal if you claimed another benefit during the reconsideration. Instead you’ll stay on the other benefit unless you withdraw your claim for it. Then you can contact the DWP and ask them to pay you ESA instead.

Can I claim ESA after losing appeal?

You can claim ESA after losing appeal if you have a worsening condition or a new condition. You would have to provide medical evidence that your condition has worsened or there is a new condition.

Recommendations

  1. Personal Independence Payment: What You Need to Know
  2. Employment and Support Allowance: A Guide to ESA for People with a Disability or Long Term Health Condition, Their Families, Carers and Advisors 
  3. Nolo’s Guide to Social Security Disability: Getting & Keeping Your Benefits
  4. Insider’s Guide to Government Benefits
  5. Social Security, Medicare and Government Pensions: Get the Most Out of Your Retirement and Medical Benefits
  6. Represent Yourself in Court: How to Prepare & Try a Winning Case

References 

Citizensadvice.org.uk

Benefitsandwork.co.uk

Publications.parliament.uk

If I lose ESA, will I also lose PIP?

Nadejda Romanciuc

Nadejda Romanciuc holds a Bachelor’s degree in psychology and a diploma in Addiction studies. She is part of the Romanian Association of Integrative Psychotherapy as a psychotherapist under supervision. She's practicing online counselling for over two years and is a strong advocate for mental health.

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