Genderflux (+ 23 other gender identities)

Genderflux (+ 23 other gender identities)

In this blog post, we will explain the difference between Genderflux and Genderfluid. We will also briefly describe the other 24 gender identities. 

What is Genderflux?

GenderFlux is a term that encompasses all gender identities that vary in intensity over time. The intensity of gender has to do with the level of identification that you have with that genre. If we think about it in percentages, 100% would be the absolute identification and 0% null.

This percentage is always changing and as it decreases the person feels more and more Gender.

A Genderflux person sometimes has a certain gender (or certain genders), sometimes has a weaker version of that gender (or such genders), and sometimes has no gender.

At least, this is the original definition; Currently, some people identify themselves as genderflux even if they are not completely genderless or who are not their gender (s) in their entirety. Genderflux is an identity most commonly defined as that of someone who experiences changes in the intensity of their gender.

For example, a gender-flow person may be masculine on some days, Demi-boy on others, and agender on others, without ever becoming just a certain gender. Another genderflux person can be maverique on certain days, demiagender (Demigirl) on others, and neutrois on others, without ever becoming genderless.

Genderflux (+ 23 other gender identities)

Genderfluid

Gender fluidity is a gender identity that can change over time and you have the feeling that you do not have a defined gender. Gender fluidity can be completely different from person to person. For example, it may express masculinity, femininity, or an androgynous personality in sexual experience or self-concept.

GenderFlux and GenderFluid (Fluid Genre) are NOT the same, but both can occur, that combination is often called FluidFlux.  GenderFluid is a gender identity where a person’s gender changes towards another or other genres over time for various personal reasons or no apparent reason.

Identities and gender

In the context of society, gender can be defined as A social construction of classification that normally perceives people with one of the binary genres (male or female) and assigns behaviour roles, expressions and characteristics for each person based on in this classification. Gender roles are allowed or expected positions, behaviours and/or responsibilities based on social norms.

Gender expression is the manifestation of each person’s gender. Unlike gender identity, gender expression is external, it is what people around you can see. A person’s gender expression does not have to be linked to their gender.

Gender is not dictated by chromosomes, hormones, genitalia, clothing, etc. It is made up of an understanding of yourself and your perception. The assigned sex is given by biology while gender goes beyond it. Accordingly, no gender is invalid. 

Someone may be binary gender (male or female), maybe non-binary (neither male nor female, multiple genders at the same time, flowing between genders, etc.), or may have no gender.

Cisexual: A cisexual or ‘cis’ person is one who identifies exclusively with the gender/sex assigned to him at birth.

Transsexual: It is an umbrella term for anyone whose gender differs from the sex and / or gender assigned to them at birth.

Transgender: Term that seeks to blur the transcendence of sex reassignment interventions on a person who is not under the gender assigned to him at birth.

Trans *: with an asterisk, to underline the diversity of the experiences of people who exceed the norms on what is prescribed as characteristic of women and men, evidencing the rigidity of the binary system in which we live.

Gender dysphoria: Anguish or unhappiness experienced because someone’s gender does not match the gender/sex assigned to them at birth. It can be social (when strangers automatically assume a gender that is not yours) or body (when gender identity collides with physical appearance)

Transition: The process of accepting oneself following some changes to affirm gender and / or alleviate dysphoria. A moment in which a person begins to live according to their gender and not the one assigned to them, which may include change of name, clothing, etc. It can also include medical and legal aspects, including taking hormones, operations or changing identity documents.

Genderflux (+ 23 other gender identities)

Transsexual man: Person who was assigned as a woman at birth but is a man. You can choose whether you want to transition or not. Some people use the term FTM (Female to Male).

Transsexual woman: Person who was assigned as a man at birth but is a woman. You can choose whether you want to transition or not. Some people use the term MTF (Male to Female)

Biggen: Person who has two genders. They can be binary or non-binary. These genres can be felt simultaneously or alternate between them. You have a meaningful gender identity that spans both genders, you may feel one of these more but both are there.

Trigender: Person who has three genders. They can be binary or non-binary. These genres can be felt simultaneously or alternate between them.

Multi-gender / Poly-gender: Person who has more than one gender. You can use this tag because the number of genres you have is unknown or fluctuates.

Pan-gender / Omnigender: They have multiple, and sometimes all, genders. It can occur simultaneously, or one by one.

Aporagender: Both a feeling of belonging to a specific gender and an umbrella term of being a separate non-binary gender of man or woman or any gender between them; but they still have a strong feeling of belonging to a specific genre.

Maverique: someone with an autonomous genre that exists completely independent of binary genres. It is not close to the feminine, masculine gender, nor is it a mixture of both. Nor is it a lack of gender or an indifferent attitude towards it.

Non-binary gender: Both a specific identity and an umbrella term for gender identities outside of binary genres.

Genderqueer: Someone whose gender exists outside and beyond society’s binary conception of gender, often not conforming to it. People who get sexually or romantically attracted to them are called Skolisexuals.

Genderfluid: Having a gender that changes. This person’s identity may fluctuate between genders and/or maybe felt by several simultaneously. Your identity can be independent or end to a circumstance.

Genderflux: Someone whose gender fluctuates intensely.For example, Agenderflux.

Androgynous: Gender that is simultaneously feminine and masculine, not necessarily in equal parts.

Genderflux (+ 23 other gender identities)

Neutral gender: It can mean several things: Feeling that your gender is within the spectrum of binary genres. Feeling that your gender has nothing to do with binary genres.

Intergender: This gender identity has two contradictory currents on when it should be used. One of them defines him as any person (dyadic or intersex) who identifies himself between or as a mixture of binary genres. The other blame inappropriate for dyadic people to use this term.

Dyadic: People who are not intersex, were born with sexual characteristics that can be categorized into any binary gender (they may also be transsexual)

Gender Indifferent: It means being apathetic about your gender or its expression, you may not have a strong feeling about your gender or the concept of gender in general.

Graygender: This identity involves having a weak feeling of gender or being somewhat more apathetic towards their own identity (gender expression. These people do feel a gender although they may feel disconnected from their gender, not too much involved in gender as a concept or not particularly interested in her genre.

You might enjoy reading about Georges Lebar (RuPaul’s Husband) and understand how genders have become fluid and relationships non-conventional.

Because of a large number of choices one has in terms of gender, it has now become difficult for people to tell which gender they belong to. Therefore, if you’re still confused about your gender, you can try the What gender am i test.

Conclusions

In this blog post, I explained the difference between Genderflux and Genderfluid. We also briefly described the other 24 gender identities. 

GenderFlux is a term that encompasses all gender identities that vary in intensity over time. The intensity of gender has to do with the level of identification that you have with that genre. If we think about it in percentages, 100% would be the absolute identification and 0% null.

GenderFlux and GenderFluid (Fluid Genre) are NOT the same, but both can occur, that combination is often called FluidFlux. GenderFluid is a gender identity where a person’s gender changes towards another or other genres over time for various personal reasons or no apparent reason.

If you have any questions or comments on the content, please let us know!

FAQ about Gendeflux

What is Genderflux?

A Genderflux person sometimes has a certain gender (or certain genders), sometimes has a weaker version of that gender (or such genders), and sometimes has no gender.

What does Aporagender mean?

Aporagender is both a feeling of belonging to a specific gender and an umbrella term of being a separate non-binary gender of man or woman or any gender between them, but they still have a strong feeling of belonging to a specific genre.

What is Demifluid?

A Demifluid (or semi-fluid) identifies itself as part of a static gender (it can be man, woman, non-binary, schedule) and part of a gender that changes (it can also be man, woman, non-binary, schedule ).

What is the difference between Genderfluid and Genderflux?

The difference between Genderfluid and Genderflux is crucial. Genderfluid is a gender identity where a person’s gender changes towards another or other genres over time for various personal reasons or no apparent reason. While Genderflux means a change in intensity. 

What is it called when you have no gender?

When you have no gender you may consider yourself agender. Someone Agender prefers to avoid gender language, not belonging to any of the binaries and not having a general way of referring to. 

Further reading

Exploring the Dimensions of Human Sexuality, by  Jerrold S. Greenberg

Diversity in Couple and Family Therapy: Ethnicities, Sexualities, and Socioeconomics, by Shalonda Kelly

Identities and Inequalities: Exploring the Intersections of Race, Class, Gender, & Sexuality (B&b Sociology) by David Newman 

Just Your Type: Create the Relationship You’ve Always Wanted Using the Secrets of Personality Type, by Paul D. Tieger 

References

transequality.org/

Genderqueerid.com

nonbinary.wiki/

Genderflux (+ 23 other gender identities)

Nadejda Romanciuc

Nadejda Romanciuc holds a Bachelor’s degree in psychology and a diploma in Addiction studies. She is part of the Romanian Association of Integrative Psychotherapy as a psychotherapist under supervision. She's practicing online counselling for over two years and is a strong advocate for mental health.