Abrosexual (as part of the asexual spectrum)

Abrosexual

Abrosexuality is generally considered part of the asexual spectrum.

Although in this blog we will focus more on the A-spec identity, we will also talk briefly about other gender identities and expressions that absrosexuals can relate to. 

What does it mean to be abrosexual? 

Abrosexual people have a fluid sexuality identity and expression. In simple terms, abrosexuality means that one’s gender identity can vary from days to weeks.

For example, one person may change between pansexual, bisexual or asexual.

Also, they can also be heterosexual, homosexual or polysexual – there is really no limit to the fluctuation of abrosexual people. 

Abrosexual (as part of the asexual spectrum)

What is asexuality?

Asexuality is a sexual orientation characterized by a lack of interest in sex. Some critics disagree that asexuality is considered a sexual orientation because asexuals do not engage in sexual behaviour.

According to other experts, asexual disinterest in sex is precisely an approach to sexuality.

In conclusion, the identification of asexuality as a sexual orientation is well-founded.

The concept of asexuality began to be analyzed in the 1940s and was recognized in 1970.

After 1990 the first asexual community was born, social networks were created through which followers of this belief established connections.

The definition of this term is not extremely clear. Some people with this belief have sexual and romantic relationships in various forms.

According to studies, about 1% of the global population is asexual. Asexuality does not exclude friendship, love and deep relationships with other people.

An asexual person simply does not show sexual attraction to other people.

However, they may experience romantic attraction or a more complex relationship.

Some such cases may involve the existence of two sexual orientations; for example, the situation of a woman who feels romantically attracted to another woman could be identified as an asexual lesbian.

Asexuality should not be confused with abstinence – abstinence is an individual choice meant to avoid sexuality for personal reasons.

Asexuality is not a choice, but rather a natural inclination. As with other sexual manifestations, it often manifests itself from the age of puberty.

In a society with people who have different sexual orientations, asexual people are in delicate situations.

Ignorance of sexual activity can trigger awkward discussions, and the person in question may face rejection from others.

For this reason, most people of this type prefer to build relationships with people with the same beliefs.

From this aspect results the importance of the role of sexual attraction in this orientation.

Abrosexual (as part of the asexual spectrum)

Relationship with others 

Asexual people have the same emotional needs as any other person.

As in other sexual communities, how these needs are met differs from case to case.

Some asexuals prefer solitude, others are happy in a group of close friends, and others express the desire to have more intimate romantic relationships.

Asexual people do not reject the idea of ​​meeting people with sexual orientations.

Based on sexual attraction or not, all relationships are based on common things: communication, closeness, humour, enthusiasm, trust.

Unlike others, asexuals have fewer expectations about how intimate relationships will work.

Flirting and monogamy in a relationship without sexual implications can even be a challenge.

However, even without sexual expectations, we can build fundamental relationships for our desires and needs.

Attraction

Many asexuals live the experience of attraction to others, but do not feel the need to complete it sexually.

Usually, I feel the need to know, to be in a relationship and to get closer to others.

Asexual people who are attracted to others often tend to approach those of the same gender and will be identified as lesbian, gay or bisexual.

Arousal

Normally, sexual arousal is a common phenomenon although it is not always associated with the desire to have one or more partners.

Some will prefer occasional masturbation without feeling the need for a sexual partner.

Other asexual people experience arousal less or not at all. Because they are not interested in sex, they do not feel the lack of sexual stimulation and channel their energies on other types of pleasure.

Abrosexual (as part of the asexual spectrum)

10 unknown things about asexuality

1. Asexuality is not a choice. Celibacy is a choice, asexuality is a sexual orientation, just like homosexuality.

2. The official definition of asexuality refers to “a person who does not experience sexual attraction.”

3. Asexuality does not necessarily involve masturbation. Many asexuals have a sexual appetite, but this does not lead to sexual completion.

4. Asexuals are not necessarily those who do not experience the attractions, but who do not feel the need to have sexual contact.

5. The author of some sexual orientation tests chose to evaluate homosexual orientation with zero and heterosexual orientation with 6. A separate, X-rated category of those who did not choose any of the (asexual) sexual orientations was also introduced. 1.5% of men chose variant X.

6. A 1994 study found that 1.05% of respondents were never sexually attracted to a person.

7. A 1982 study of Playboy magazine found that 2% of respondents were asexual.

8. Women prefer asexuality in a higher percentage than men.

9. Research has shown that 33.57% of asexual people have problems with self-esteem.

10. According to asexuality.org, asexuals believe that no action should be taken to solve their problem. Asexuals feel comfortable without sex!

Abrosexual (as part of the asexual spectrum)

Sexual Fluidity 

Sexual fluidity means that even if you do not take into account the sex of the person you choose to stay with, you have moments in life when you tend to prefer certain sex.

If at the age of 20, for example, you tend to spend more time with men, at the age of 30 this can change, and you are attracted to the presence of women.

We define sexual fluidity as a capacity for a change in sexual attraction depending on changes in the situation or conditions in the environment or relationship.

The concept of sexual fluidity does not exclude the existence of sexual orientation (heterosexual, homosexual, bisexual and so on).

Rather, fluidity leaves room for change and movement, says Diamond.

It is important to note that not everyone has the same degree of fluidity, and some people do not experience fluidity at all, which is also perfectly normal.

Sexuality is not chosen and comes naturally to everyone.

Other sexual orientations

Pansexual  – Pansexuals are those people who can fall in love sexually, emotionally and spiritually by anyone, regardless of sexual identity. 

Polysexual – Like pansexual, polysexual can be attracted to anyone, regardless of gender, male or female. However, for polysexual, sexual identity matters.

For example, if a polysexual is attracted to women, he will also be attracted to people who identify as women, such as transgender people. 

Panromantic – A panromantic person is emotionally and spiritually attracted to anyone, regardless of gender or gender identity, but is not sexually attracted to them. 

Skoliosexual –  In the case of skoliosexual, sexual attraction is manifested on people of non-binary sexual identity who do not identify with their natural sex, such as transsexuals.

Abrosexual (as part of the asexual spectrum)

Asexual  – Asexuals are “people who do not feel sexual attraction” and, most of the time, not even emotionally.

According to asexuality.org, they may feel the desire to show affection for a person without having sexual desires. 

Aromatic – An aromatic person feels very little or no romantic attraction to other people. “Aromantic people do not lack the ability to establish emotional or personal connections, but they do not feel the instinctual need to make such connections. This identity is not a choice, but it is innate “, notes asexuality.org. 

Graysexual –  Jared, a man who claims to be graysexual, defines the term as “a bridge between asexuality and sexuality.

Graysexuals can also be identified as heterosexual or homosexual or with any other sexual identity. Although they will feel a physical attraction to other people, they will not necessarily feel the need to have sex. 

Queerplatonic relationships – Queerplatonic relationships are not romantic by nature, but they involve a deeper and more intense emotional connection than in the case of a traditional friendship.

The partners are called, in this case, “zucchini”. 

Demisexual –  A person who defines himself as demisexual does not feel sexual attraction to a person unless he has already established a deep emotional connection with the other, although it is not necessarily about falling in love, so it may not be romantic.

If the connection has an intense romantic character then it is called demiromantic.

Lithromantic –  The term “lithromantic” describes a person who has feelings of love but does not want them to be reciprocal, a type of amorous masochism.

Conclusions

Abrosexuality is generally considered part of the asexual spectrum.

Although in this blog we focused more on the A-spec identity, we also talked briefly about other gender identities and expressions that absrosexuals can relate to. 

Abrosexual people have a fluid sexuality identity and expression. In simple terms, abrosexuality means that one’s gender identity can vary from days to weeks.

For example, one person may change between pansexual, bisexual or asexual. Also, they can also be heterosexual, homosexual or polysexual – there is really no limit to the fluctuation of abrosexual people. 

Asexuality is a sexual orientation characterized by a lack of interest in sex. Some critics disagree that asexuality is considered a sexual orientation because asexuals do not engage in sexual behaviour.

According to other experts, asexual disinterest in sex is precisely an approach to sexuality. In conclusion, the identification of asexuality as a sexual orientation is well-founded.

If you have any questions, comments or recommendations on the subject, please let us know!

FAQ about abrosexuals

What is Abrosexual?

Abrosexual people have a fluid sexuality identity and expression. In simple terms, abrosexuality means that one’s gender identity can vary from days to weeks.

For example, one person may change between pansexual, bisexual or asexual.

What is Skoliosexual?

 In the case of skoliosexual, sexual attraction is manifested on people of non-binary sexual identity who do not identify with their natural sex, such as transsexuals.

What is it called when you are sexually attracted to everything?

When you are attracted to someone regardless of their gender identity and expression, you are a pansexual.

Pansexuals are those people who can fall in love sexually, emotionally and spiritually by anyone, regardless of sexual identity. 

What is a Demisexual?

A person who defines himself as demisexual does not feel sexual attraction to a person unless he has already established a deep emotional connection with the other, although it is not necessarily about falling in love, so it may not be romantic.

If the connection has an intense romantic character then it is called demiromantic.

What causes a man to be asexual?

There are no obvious causes why someone is asexual like there are no common causes for why someone is pansexual, bisexual or skoliosexual.

Asexuality is not caused but childhood trauma neither is genetic. 

Recommendations

Exploring the Dimensions of Human Sexuality, by  Jerrold S. Greenberg

Diversity in Couple and Family Therapy: Ethnicities, Sexualities, and Socioeconomics, by Shalonda Kelly

Identities and Inequalities: Exploring the Intersections of Race, Class, Gender, & Sexuality (B&b Sociology) by David Newman 

Just Your Type: Create the Relationship You’ve Always Wanted Using the Secrets of Personality Type, by Paul D. Tieger 

References

Asexuality.org

queerundefined.com/

lgbta.wikia.org

Abrosexual (as part of the asexual spectrum)

Nadejda Romanciuc

Nadejda Romanciuc holds a Bachelor’s degree in psychology and a diploma in Addiction studies. She is part of the Romanian Association of Integrative Psychotherapy as a psychotherapist under supervision. She's practicing online counselling for over two years and is a strong advocate for mental health.