3w4 vs 3w2 Enneagram subtypes (A complete guide)

3w4 vs 3w2 Enneagram subtypes (A complete guide)

In this blog post, we will talk about the 3w4 vs 3w2 Enneagram subtypes, right after we briefly describe Enneagram type 3.  

Enneagram type 3 

3w4 and 3w2 are subtypes of the Enneagram type 3, known as The Achiever/The Competitive. 

We call the third typology Competitive / The achiever because when is in healthy levels, those of this typology want to be “in the first place” in many areas of life. They are the “stars” of human nature and are often admired for the goodwill with which they also show the achievements they have achieved. 

They realize how good they feel when they grow inside and contribute through skills to the smooth running of the world. They also like to motivate others to give better results than they were capable of before. They are the embodiment of what is best in a culture, and others can see their hopes and dreams reflected in them.

3w4 vs 3w2 Enneagram subtypes (A complete guide)

Competitors are often pleasant and successful people because, of all the typologies, they have the most confidence in their own agenda and in the ability to develop their talent and abilities.

Because they show qualities highly valued by society, they become true role models for others. Those in healthy levels know that it is worth the effort to be as good as possible, and their success. 

Competitors want to make sure their lives are crowned by success, but it depends on their family, culture and social sphere how they want to look at this. 

In some families, success means having a lot of money, a big house, an expensive and new car and other symbols of social status. 

Others value ideas, and for them, success means to distinguish themselves in the academic or scientific spheres. In other circles, maybe it meant becoming a famous actor, or model, or writer, or generally a public figure, perhaps a politician.

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No matter how success is defined, Competitors will try to become someone worthy of restraint in their family and community. They will not allow themselves to be a “nobody”.

To succeed in this direction, they learn to orient themselves towards different goals and behave in such a way as to be praised and surround themselves with attention. As a child, they learned to recognize activities cherished by parents and colleagues, so they joined forces to excel in them. They also learned how to cultivate and develop

the good parts that impress or attract others.

The problem is that rushing to get something to increase in value, they can become so foreign to themselves that they do not know what they really want or what their feelings or interests really are.

3w4 vs 3w2 Enneagram subtypes (A complete guide)

3w2 – The charmer

Famous examples: Bill Clinton, Elvis Presley, John Travolta, Christopher Reeve, Shania Twain, Paul McCartney, Sharon Stone, Dick Clark, Jane Pauley, Kathie Lee Gifford, Tony Robbins.

Healthy subtype: Competitors in this subtype are more emotional and spontaneous than those belonging to the other subtype. Resembles with type Seven in terms of boldness and manner to be full of life. They can be friendly, jumpy and generous as typology Two, but maintaining his posture, self-esteem and the desire to have important personal achievements of the Competitors.

They want to be loved and feel the need to get closer to people, but sometimes they replace public life and the recognition of society with life more satisfactory and with domestic stability.

Medium subtype: People in this subtype are trying to suppress all features that may hinder them in an attempt to please others. They feel that their value comes from

the ability to attract or even amaze those around you. In short, they will be admired.

They know how to “turn things around” to impress, and this often becomes a concern. Their behaviour can be honeyed and artificial, which is detrimental to the attempt to become popular and credible. People of this subtype are taken often in competition with others, although they generally do so in secret. Can use multiple images to satisfy their social relationships and to deal with intimate situations.

3w4 vs 3w2 Enneagram subtypes (A complete guide)

3w4 – The professional

Famous examples: Barbara Streisand, Oprah Winfrey, Tom Cruise, Ben Kingsley, Madonna, Sting, Richard Gere, Michael Jordan, Whitney Houston, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Werner Erhard.

Healthy subtype: People in this subtype feel that their esteem comes rather from career success and projects than from personal qualities. They want their work to be exceptional and admired by others, often getting very involved in her career.

They like any profession or trade they choose and they are ready to make great sacrifices to maintain their professional integrity. Even if they are diplomats and charming, they are often rather serious and work-oriented, so they can look like Perfectionists.

Medium subtype: People in this subtype are very ambitious, but lacking in self-confidence, which forces them to do so in the face of huge pressures. Their efforts to achieve perfection are similar to those of the Perfectionists, with the difference that they want to so as not to be declared inferior, rejected, and humiliated. 

They feel that they contribute their full value when engaging in a project. They often appear as competent and balanced beings but may be very socially withdrawn (in contrast to the bolder and kinder expressions of the other subtype). 

They can also to be pretentious and arrogant, but also shy and at peace with

themselves, appearing as paradoxical and sometimes contradictory.

3w4 vs 3w2 Enneagram subtypes (A complete guide)

The practical role of the Enneagram

Although not associated with any religion, one of the primary uses of the Enneagram is as a transformative tool that helps us realize our essential nature (divine nature or being) and integrate our personality. 

For those who have had an initiatory spiritual experience of awakening, the Enneagram can help determine the “inner purpose” of self-transcendence. But the Enneagram can help each of us achieve different “external goals,” because it has practical applications in many important areas of life – relationships, career guidance, business, education, and parenting.

In relationships, the Enneagram can be used to improve communication, understanding, synergy and connection by capitalizing on differences between people. 

As interdependent beings, our happiness largely depends on the quality of our relationships. And the quality of our relationships depends on our self-esteem and desire to value the uniqueness of others.

And our self-esteem comes from making instant choices in alignment with our deepest values. Making choices momentarily in alignment with our deepest values ​​comes from our deep knowledge and our inner wisdom.

3w4 vs 3w2 Enneagram subtypes (A complete guide)

Another use of the Enneagram, as well as of all the other systems of evolution and personal determination, is the professional orientation. Each of us has innate talents that come to us so naturally that we don’t even see them as gifts. Unfortunately, many people do not know what they are.

 In his book “The Pathfinder: How to Choose or Change Your Career for a Life of Satisfaction and Success,” Nicholas Lore interviewed 1,500 people and found that:

  • only 10% of them felt that their work matched their personality and was a tool for personal expression.
  • 20% of people enjoyed their work most of the time,
  • 30% accepted their work without a fight,
  • 30% go to work because they are forced by circumstances
  • 10% feel like their job is hell!

So maybe up to 70% of people don’t enjoy their work. Do you think it affects their relationships? Health? Self-esteem? Enjoy life? Inner peace? World peace !?

In business, the Enneagram can be used for team building, conflict management, increasing self-leadership and increasing productivity by maximizing each person’s unique gifts.

In education, the Enneagram can be used to help teachers understand students’ different needs and adapt their teaching to reflect an awareness of these different needs. It can help children better understand themselves and others, as well as help them plan their lives.

In parenting, Enneagram can help parents truly understand and cultivate their children’s individuality. With knowledge of the Enneagram (and other systems of personal discovery), parents can increase their children’s self-esteem by encouraging them to use their natural gifts and talents.

3w4 vs 3w2 Enneagram subtypes (A complete guide)

FAQ about 3w4 vs 3w2 Enneagram subtypes

What does Type 3 personality mean?

Type 3 personality is called the Competitors. Competitors are often pleasant and successful people because, of all the typologies, they have the most confidence in their own sheets and in the ability to develop their talent and abilities. Because they show qualities highly valued by society, they become true role models for others. 

What does 3w4 mean?

The 3w4 Enneagram subtype describes a type 3 with wing 4. People in this subtype feel that their self-esteem comes from career and project success rather than personal qualities. They want their work to be exceptional and admired by others, often getting very involved in their careers. 

What is a 3 wing 2?

3 wing 2 is an Enneagram subtype. Competitors in this subtype are more emotional and spontaneous than those belonging to the other subtype. Resembles with type Seven in terms of boldness and manner to be full of life. They can be friendly, jumpy and generous as typology Two, but maintaining his posture, self-esteem and the desire to have important personal achievements of the Competitors.

What is an unhealthy 3?

Unhealthy 3s are very ambitious, but lack self-confidence, which forces them to face huge pressures. Their efforts to attain perfection are similar to those of the Perfectionists, with the difference that they want to be so as not to be declared inferior, rejected, and humiliated. 

What is the most common Enneagram type?

The most common Enneagram type is considered the six. However, seven and nines are also very common. 

How do I find my Enneagram wing?

EachEnneagram type has two wings and three instinctual variants. These two “lenses” help us focus on our personality traits with greater precision and specificity. The enneagram is also unique in that it shows us the ways to develop, to evolve. It accurately traces the paths of our growth and evolution, but also those that lead us to involution. 

Conclusions

In this article, we briefly described Enneagram type 3 and explained the differences between 3w4 vs 3w2 Enneagram subtypes. We also talked about the practical role of the Enneagram personality test. 

We call the third typology Competitive / The achiever because when is in healthy levels, those of this typology want to be “in the first place” in many areas of life. They are the “stars” of human nature and are often admired for the goodwill with which they also show the achievements they have achieved. 

Subtype 3w2 is called the Dreamer. Generally, they want to be loved and feel the need to get closer to people, but sometimes they replace public life and the recognition of society with life more satisfactory and with domestic stability.

Subtype 3w4 is called the Professional. They like any profession or trade they choose and they are ready to make great sacrifices to maintain their professional integrity. Even if they are diplomats and charming, they are often rather serious and work-oriented, so they can look like Perfectionists.

If you have any comments or questions, please let us know!

Further reading 

The Wisdom of the Enneagram: The Complete Guide to Psychological and Spiritual Growth for the Nine Personality Types, by Don Richard Riso 

Enneagram Self-Discovery: Understand Personality Types to Enhance Your Spiritual Growth & Build Healthy Relationships, by Elliot Hudson 

The Enneagram Of Personality: Why Discovering Your Unique Personality Type Is Essential For Your Personal Growth, by Arthur Canfield 

The Road Back to You: An Enneagram Journey to Self-Discovery (The Road Back to You Set), by Ian Morgan Cron

The Sacred Enneagram: Finding Your Unique Path to Spiritual Growth, by Christopher L. Heuertz  

References

The Wisdom of the Enneagram: The Complete Guide to Psychological and Spiritual Growth for the Nine Personality Types, by Don Richard Riso 

Personality Types: Using the Enneagram for Self-Discovery, by Don Richard Riso, Russ Hudson

Understanding the Enneagram: The Practical Guide to Personality Types, by Don Richard Riso, Russ Hudson

Enneagrampaths.com

3w4 vs 3w2 Enneagram subtypes (A complete guide)

Nadejda Romanciuc

Nadejda Romanciuc holds a Bachelor’s degree in psychology and a diploma in Addiction studies. She is part of the Romanian Association of Integrative Psychotherapy as a psychotherapist under supervision. She's practicing online counselling for over two years and is a strong advocate for mental health.